What I’m Jotting Down in My Moleskine: Quick Notes From Cluetrain

30Jul07

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I have been revisiting The Cluetrain Manifesto, a classic, must-read work by Chris Locke, Doc Searls, and David Weinberger. Here are a few notes from the opening pages I jotted down in my Moleskine :

  • “The return of the human voice” replaces the “monotone of the mission statement.”

  • “Empower the public to speak on your behalf.”
  • “Markets are Conversations.”
  • “Markets are human beings, not demographic segments.”
  • Right now we are witnessing “a new social organization.”
  • “Markets are getting smarter.”
  • They are “looking for information from each other rather than vendors.”
  • “What’s happening among markets is also happening among employees.”
  • “Companies that speak in the language of the pitch are no longer speaking to anyone.”
  • “Companies that use to assume that markets networking online are the same markets that use to watch their 30 second ads are killing themselves.”
  • Companies need to show “big values, a little humility, straight talk and a genuine point of view.”
  • “Companies must share the concerns of their communities- but first they must belong to a community.”

  • “If corporate culture ends before the community begins- they’ll have no market.”
  • “Today the org. chart is hyperlinked, not hierarchical. Respect for hands-on knowledge wins over respect for abstract authority.”
  • “Lack of conversation kils companies.”
  • “Smart companies will get out of the way and let the inevitable happen sooner.”
  • “The inflated, self-important jargon you sling around in the press, at your conferences- what’s that got to do with us?- maybe you’re impressing your investor, maybe you’re impressing Wall Street but you’re not impressing us.”
  • “We like this new market better- in fact, we’re creating it. If you want to barter with us, get down off of that channel.”
  • “If you want us to talk to you, tell us something; make it something interesting for a change.”
  • “You want us to pay? We want you to pay attention.”
  • “We want you to take 50 million of us as seriously as you take one reporter from the WSJ”

  • “What if the real fascination with the internet is not its fancy technology but its throwback to our prehistoric pastime of telling tales?”
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