Be a Resource, Not a Tool

20Feb09

487006725_e3ef1fbe321As the 2.0 space continues to evolve, self-proclaimed “experts”, “leaders” and “visionaries” are a dime a dozen. They drop self-serving knowledge on you like a Sensei in a Karate class your Mom made you take. They demand you bow to them and follow their lead, because someday you might be lucky enough to reach their mythical stature (even though they really don’t care either way).

What kills me about these people is the sheer irony of it all. While preaching the gospel of feedback and engagement, they themselves don’t do either quite well. They plead for “transparency”, “relationships” and mock former clients /employers on their lack of social media know-how (often in public forums). This isn’t professional, nor is it productive.

If you’ve got a few hundred or thousand Twitter followers, a chance to speak in public or an opportunity to share your “expertise”, please do it tastefully, intelligently and respectfully. Be a teacher, not a preacher.

Take a hint from some of the pros that actually engage, actually converse and actually have enough credible experience to be worthy of these titles (which they will most often humbly defer) and do the right thing.

If you’ve got a message, I’m asking you to not let your ego overshadow it. I know it’s hard, but it’s worth it.

-Will Wheeler

Photo courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons



2 Responses to “Be a Resource, Not a Tool”

  1. “They demand you bow to them and follow their lead, because someday you might be lucky enough to reach their mythical stature (even though they really don’t care either way).” Classic. Great post Will.

  2. 2 sarahhutton

    Will, I love this post. It sums this situation up so well. As someone told me earlier this morning, “some people let a few thousand or even a couple hundred twitter followers get to their head!”



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